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This Saturday, May 25th: The Second Annual Scientists Fair

Ann Arbor Science & Skeptics is hosting their second annual “Scientists Fair” this Saturday, May 25th from 1:00-3:00pm at the downtown Ann Arbor library.

Participants talking with physicists Dr. Sean Tulin and Dr. Brian Nord. (Including my daughter and I)

Ann Arbor Science & Skeptics is hosting their second annual “Scientists Fair” this Saturday, May 25th from 1:00-3:00pm at the downtown library. This event will feature scientists and researchers in a variety of fields including cosmology, evolution, human cloning, geology, climate change, and nuclear power – all available to answer questions or provide explanations. It is open to the public.

Located in the Multi-Purpose room (in the lower level of the main branch of the Ann Arbor Library), there will be several professors and researchers from the University of Michigan and other institutions with expertise in general fields of knowledge, available to answer your questions. Some of the topics will include particle physics, human cloning, climate change, the Big Bang, and more.

You can watch a short video about the Scientists Fair here (video).

The purpose of this event is to not only acquaint people to scientific knowledge, but also to how that knowledge is obtained. We want people to ask these experts how theories are supported with experimentation, what hypotheses were tested and confirmed or falsified, and to what extent is there consensus amongst their colleagues about a given theory.

2 thoughts on “This Saturday, May 25th: The Second Annual Scientists Fair

  1. Preston O. Cunningham says:

    Kass: First, there is a tendency among those with a scientific world view to believe that science has a monopoly on the truth about the way things are. But science has great power as a means of gaining knowledge only because it has left out many of the important questions. Its view of the world is value- neutral. It deliberately doesn’t ask questions about the what and the why of things. It only asks how they work. This is at best a partial knowledge of the world masquerading as the whole. So the belief that the only things that are real are matter, energy and motion, that is a philosophical kind of imperialism, which we have been suffering under increasingly for centuries.

    • Adam Bourque says:

      Unfortunately you are wrong. Science looks to answer all questions. Science has done something that no other method has yet to do. It adapts as new knowledge is gained. If it finds something wrong, it changes.

      Many religions, for instance, remain in the dark ages. Choosing to ignore new knowledge in favor of ancient documents produced by sheep herders wondering where the Sun goes at night.

      BTW, science is not a philosophy. It’s a method.

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