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Michigan Skeptics Presents: Sam Singleton the Atheist Evangelist

Brother Sam’s show is called, “Cats, Sheep and Goats: The Taxonomy of Atheists, Believers and Preachers”

Michigan Skeptics is proud to present Sam Singleton in his return to Michigan.

Brother Sam is presenting his latest show: Cats, Sheep and Goats: The Taxonomy of Atheists, Believers and Preachers.

Brother Sam and his cousin Palmer have followed widely disparate paths, Sam becoming an atheist evangelist, Palmer remaining faithful to their holy roller upbringing. Palmer is the one member of the Singleton clan who has stuck by Sam. And Sam is exasperated that anybody so smart and decent can be so misguided. Palmer feels exactly the same way. Their conversations, as recounted in Cats, Sheep and Goats: the Taxonomy of Atheists, Believers and Preachers, are a fun-house-mirror view of relations between atheists and believers.

This will be the third time for MISkeptics to host Brother Sam. It’s a sell out every time. Get ready to laugh until it hurts. Sam Singleton is a force all his own.

Tickets for Sam Singleton are $15 at the door and $10 in Advance. You can purchase tickets online by RSVPing at our Meetup page, our Facebook page, or you can purchase the tickets directly by following this link.

Greta Christina to Speak in Grand Rapids and Farmington Hills.

CFI-Michigan is co-sponsoring this lecture with The Birmingham Temple Congregation for Humanistic Judaism.

Greta Christina will speak on her newest book “Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why”

Coming out is the most powerful political act atheists can take. But coming out can be difficult and risky. What are some specific, practical, nuts-and-bolts strategies we can use: to come out of the closet, to support each other in coming out, and to make the atheist community a safer place to come out into? What can atheists learn about coming out from the LGBT community and their decades of coming-out experience — and what can we learn from the important differences between coming out atheist and coming out queer?

She will be speaking in Grand Rapids on September 10th and in Farmington Hills on the 11th.

Greta will be speaking in Grand Rapids and in Farmington Hills

About the Speaker

Greta Christina has been writing professionally since 1989, on topics including atheism, sexuality and sex-positivity, LGBT issues, politics, culture, and whatever crosses her mind.

She is author of Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless, and of Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories About Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More, and is editor of Paying For It: A Guide for Sex Workers for Their Clients. She has been a public speaker for many years, and is on the speaker’s bureaus of the Secular Student Alliance and Center for Inquiry. She is a regular contributor to AlterNet, Salon, The Humanist, and Free Inquiry. Her writing has appeared in magazines and newspapers including Ms., Penthouse, Chicago Sun-Times, On Our Backs, and Skeptical Inquirer, and anthologies including Everything You Know About God Is Wrong and three volumes of Best American Erotica. She lives in San Francisco with her wife, Ingrid. She tweets at @GretaChristina, and has been writing about atheism on Greta Christina’s Blog since 2005.

Additional Details

Meetings are open to the Public

Cost: FREE ($5 Suggested Donation).

Click here to RSVP for the Grand Rapids lecture.

Click here to RSVP for the Farmington Hills lecture.

Location and times are in the RSVP.

 

Notre Dame Professor Debunks Christian Myth of Persecution

 

Professor Candida Moss Portrait
Professor Candida Moss teaches early Christianity at the University of Notre Dame.

Candida Moss, a Professor at Notre Dame University and practicing Catholic, has written a book that tackles the “myth of martyrdom in the Christian faith.”

Sunday school tales of early Christians being rounded up at their secret catacomb meetings and thrown to the lions by evil Romans are mere fairy tales, Moss writes in a new book. In fact, in the first 250 years of Christianity, Romans mostly regarded the religion’s practitioners as meddlesome members of a superstitious cult.

The government actively persecuted Christians for only about 10 years, Moss suggests, and even then intermittently. And, she says, many of the best known early stories of brave Christian martyrs were entirely fabricated.

In Professor Moss’ new book, The Myth of Persecution: How Early Christians Invented a Story of Martyrdom, she maintains that the Catholic Church and historians have known for centuries that most early Christian martyr stories were exaggerated or invented.

[W]hen Christians were executed, it was often not because of their religious beliefs but because they wouldn’t follow Roman rules. Many laws that led to early Christians’ execution were not specifically targeted at them—such as a law requiring all Roman citizens to engage in a public sacrifice to the gods—but their refusal to observe those laws and other mores of Roman society led to their deaths.

Moss calls early Christians “rude, subversive and disrespectful,” noting that they refused to swear oaths, join the military or participate in any other part of Roman society.

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